Archive

Phillip Lopate describes the shape of Manhattan Island as‘a luxury liner, permanently docked, going nowhere’. This feeling of being tethered to the land, unable to get to sea, was a feature of New York life for much of the twentieth century. New York was an island without a coast. The West Side piers that once welcomed the Lusitania spent most of the twentieth century crumbling or behind barbed wire, while the East Side’s coves and points were cut off from pedestrians by six lanes of the Robert Moses-designed Franklin Delano Roosevelt Drive. It wasn’t much easier to reach the shores of Brooklyn, Queens or the Bronx, either: with a few exceptions, they were largely reserved for municipal or industrial use, and easiest to see from the Staten Island Ferry (en route to the borough with the most beaches). Now, slowly, the city is reclaiming its shoreline, with some spectacular results.

Formica Dinette and Underwater Teapot by Alexis Neider

“Formica Dinette,” 2011. Monotype, Dypoint, Silk Screen.

“Formica Dinette,” 2011. Monotype, Dypoint, Silk Screen.

“UnderWater Teapot #1,” 2011. Watercolor.

“UnderWater Teapot #1,” 2011. Watercolor.

Artist Statement

During a particularly trying time in my life, my relationship to food changed. It was during this period that I realized the connection between taste and emotion. The series that emerged from this experience deals with the complex mixture of comfort, craving, and emptiness that food conjures.

The spaces we devote to food dually embody appetite and void. The ornate table is poised for celebration and fulfillment, yet fraught with the tension of absent dishes and absent guests. The delicate teapot hints at stories told, and perhaps since forgotten, over tea.


Alexis Neider loves NYC waterways almost as much as she loves NYC pools. She has a B.A. from Vassar College and M.S.T from Fordham College. She studied painting for four years at the Art Students League and now has a studio at WorkSpace Harlem. Alexis is a teacher by day at the Neighborhood School where she teaches the 3Rs along with wood-working, sewing, and movie-making. She is particularly proud of a movie her students made sawing a play-dough brain in half. Alexis’ work has been exhibited at Atlantic Gallery, ArtSpace, Umbrella Arts, and Local Project. Her work can be seen here: alexisneider.com